geometric.

This painting was a spin on the theme of geometry within nature, but also a connection to my previous purple mountain painting. I wanted to extend the idea of depicting a landscape through an abstract painting but this time, add a lot more edged shapes and geometry to the composition.

I was heavily inspired by Jennifer Sparacino’s bold and blocky acrylic paintings. I really like the integration between the loud, vibrant strokes of colour as well as the almost synthetic scratches onto the paint. The contrast between the monotonous background and the active foreground makes for an extremely interesting visual dynamic.

J. Sparacino

J. Sparacino

 

J. Sparacino

J. Sparacino

I wanted to emulate Sparacino’s artistic style in this piece so I stayed with the vibrant colours while keeping in mind the need to create a sense of three-dimensionality with overlapping shapes as well as varying angles. I paid close attention to which colours I chose to go beside one another in order to create the most aesthetically pleasing as well as the most contrasting combinations. The purpose of keeping the top of the mountain higher in detail was to create the sensation of a high, jagged mountain flattening out into a rolling plain. The sharp, angular strokes that are scattered around the painting reminded me of man-made intruders invading an organic space. I also chose to use a neutral teal as the background in order to accentuate the dynamism of the mountain even more.

photo 3

10b) Untitled

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